5 – Fixed Situations

501 General Regulations for Fixed Situations

  1. When play has been interrupted, it shall be resumed with a fixed situation, according to what caused the interruption.

    Fixed situations are face-offs, hit-ins, free-hits and penalty shots.

  2. The referees shall use one signal, show prescribed signs and mark the place for the fixed situation. The ball may be played after the signal if it is not moving and is in the right position.

    The referees shall first show the consequence sign and then a possible offence sign. The offence sign shall only be used if considered necessary, however always in connection with penalties and penalty shots. If, in the referees’ opinion, play is not affected, the ball does not have to be entirely still or in exactly the right place at a hit-in or a free-hit.

  3. A fixed situation shall not be unreasonably delayed.

    The referees decide what shall be considered unreasonable delay. If a fixed situation is delayed, the referees shall if possible notify the player before any action is taken.

502 Faceoff

  1. At the start of a new period and to confirm a correctly scored goal, a face-off shall be taken at the centre spot.

    A goal scored during extra time, or from a penalty shot deciding the match, or after the end of a period, shall not be confirmed with a face-off. When a face-off is taken at the centre spot, each team shall be on their own side of the centre line.

  2. When play is interrupted and neither team can be awarded a hit-in, a free-hit or a penalty shot, play shall be resumed with a face-off.
  3. A face-off shall be taken at the nearest face-off dot, according to where the ball was at the interruption.
  4. All players, except those taking the face-off, shall immediately, without summons from the referees, take a position at least 3 m from the ball, sticks included.
    Before a face-off, it is the referees' responsibility to check that the teams are ready and that all players have taken position.
  5. A face-off shall be taken by one field player from each team. The players shall be facing the opposing team's short side and must not have physical contact before the face-off. The feet shall be placed perpendicular to the centre line. Each player shall have both his feet at the same distance from the centre line. The sticks shall be held with a normal grip and with both hands above the grip mark. The blades shall be placed perpendicular to the centre line on either side of the ball, but without touching it.

    Normal grip implies the way the player holds his stick during play. The defending team’s player chooses on which side of the ball to place his stick. If the face-off is on the centre line, the visiting team’s player chooses. The ball shall be at the centres of the blades. If a player taking a face-off does not obey the referees’ instructions, another player who is on the rink shall take the face-off. In case of a dispute in connection with a substitution before a face-off is taken, the away team is obliged to carry out their substitution first.

  6. A face-off may go directly into goal.

503 Events leading to a Face-off

  1. When the ball is damaged unintentionally.
  2. When the ball is not correctly playable.

    The referees shall, before interrupting play, give the players a reasonable opportunity to play the ball.

  3. When parts of the board have been separated and the ball comes near the place in question.
  4. When the goal cage is moved unintentionally and cannot be put back within a reasonable time.

    It is the goalkeeper’s responsibility to put the goal cage back as soon as this is considered possible.

  5. When a serious injury occurs or an injured player directly affects play.

    The referees decide what shall be considered a serious injury, but as soon as this is suspected, play shall be interrupted immediately.

  6. When an unnatural situation occurs during play.

    The referees decide what shall be considered an unnatural situation, but this always includes, amongst others, unauthorized persons or objects on the rink, the lights going out either completely or partly, and the final signal being sounded by mistake, or when a referee is hit by the ball and this has a significant effect on the play.

  7. When a goal is disallowed despite the fact that no offence leading to a free-hit has been committed.

    his includes when the ball goes into goal without passing the goal line from the front.

  8. When a penalty shot does not result in a goal.

    This includes when a penalty shot is incorrectly performed.

  9. When a delayed penalty is carried out because the offending team gains and controls the ball.

    This includes when the non-offending team, in the referees’ opinion, is trying to waste time.

  10. When a penalty is imposed for an offence which is not in connection with play, but is committed or noticed during play.

     This includes when a penalized player enters the rink before his penalty expires or terminates.

  11. When the referees are unable to decide the direction of a hit-in or a free-hit.

    This includes when players from both teams commit offences simultaneously.

  12. When the referees' decision is considered incorrect.

    This includes when the referees by mistake whistles for too many players and it shows that the team is playing without goalkeeper.

504 Hit-in

  1. When the ball leaves the rink, a hit-in shall be awarded to the non-offending team.

    The offending team is considered to be the team whose player, or player’s equipment, last touched the ball before it left the rink. This also includes when a player, to remove the ball from the goal cage, hits the net without touching the ball.

  2. A hit-in shall be taken from where the ball leaves the rink, 1.5 m from the board, but never behind the imaginary extensions of the goal lines.

    If, in the referees’ opinion, play is not affected, the ball does not have to be entirely still or in exactly the right place. If a team gets an advantage from taking a hit-in closer to the board than 1,5 m, this shall be allowed. A hit-in behind the imaginary extension of the goal line shall be taken from the nearest face-off dot. When the ball touches the ceiling or objects above the rink, the hit-in shall be taken 1.5 m from the board at the same distance from the centre line.

  3. The opponents shall immediately, without summons from the referees, take a position at least 3 m from the ball, sticks included.

    The player taking the hit-in does not have to wait for the opponents to take position, but if the ball is played while the opponents are trying to take position in a correct way, no action shall be taken.

  4. The ball shall be played with the stick. It shall be hit cleanly, not dragged, flicked or lifted on the stick.
  5. The player taking the hit-in shall not touch the ball again before it has touched another player or another player's equipment.
  6. A hit-in may go directly into goal.

505 Events Leading to a Hit-in

  1. When the ball passes the board or hits the ceiling or any other object above the rink.

506 Free Hit

  1. When an offence leading to a free-hit is committed, a free-hit shall be awarded to the non- offending team.

    With offences leading to a free-hit, the advantage rule shall be applied whenever possible.
    The advantage rule implies that if the non-offending team still controls the ball after an offence, they shall have the opportunity to go on playing if this gives them a greater advantage than a free-hit. If advantage is being played, and the game is interrupted because the non-offending team loses control of the ball, the resulting free-hit shall be placed where the original offence occurred.

  2. The free-hit shall be taken where the offence was committed, but never behind the imaginary extensions of the goal lines, or closer to the goalkeeper areas than 3.5 m.

    If, in the referees’ opinion, play is not affected, the ball does not have to be entirely still or in exactly the right place. A free-hit closer to the board than 1.5 m may be moved out to this distance. A free-hit behind the imaginary extension of the goal line shall be taken from the nearest face-off dot. A free-hit closer to the goalkeeper area than 3.5 m shall be moved out to the distance of 3.5 m from the outer line of the goalkeeper area along an imaginary line from the centre of the goal line through the place where the offence was committed, leaving 0.5 m for the wall and then 3 meters free space to the free- hit point. In this case the defending team shall always have the right to form a defence line immediately outside their goalkeeper area. If the attacking team prevents or obstructs this, a free-hit shall be awarded to the defending team. The attacking team is not obliged to wait for the defending team to form the defence line, and has the right to place their players in front of the defence line.

  3. The opponents shall immediately, without summons from the referees, take a position at least 3 m from the ball, sticks included.

    The player taking the free-hit does not have to wait for the opponents to take position, but if the ball is played while the opponents are trying to take position in a correct way, no action shall be taken.

  4. The ball shall be played with the stick. It shall be hit properly, not dragged, flicked or lifted on the stick.
  5. The player taking the free-hit shall not touch the ball again before it has touched another player or another player's equipment.
  6. A free-hit may go directly into goal.

507 Offences Leading to a Free Hit

  1. When a player hits, blocks, lifts, kicks an opponent’s stick or holds an opponent or opponent's stick. (901, 902, 903, 910, 912)

    If the referees consider the player to have played the ball before hitting the opponent’s stick, no action shall be taken.

  2. When a field player raises the blade of his stick above waist level in the back swing before hitting the ball, or in the forward swing after hitting the ball. (904) 

    This includes mock shots. A high forward swing is allowed if no other players are in the vicinity, and there is no risk of injury. As waist level is considered the level of the waist when standing upright.

  3. When a field player uses any part of his stick or his foot, to play or try to play the ball above knee level. (904 913)

    Stopping the ball with a thigh is not considered to be playing the ball above knee level, unless considered dangerous. As knee level is considered the level of the knees when standing upright.

  4. When a field player places his stick, his foot or his leg between an opponent's legs or feet. (905)
  5. When a player, in control of the ball, or trying to reach it, forces or pushes an opponent in any way other than shoulder to shoulder. (907)
  6. When a player, in control of the ball, trying to reach it, or trying to get a better position, moves backwards into an opponent, or prevents an opponent from moving in the direction intended. (908, 911)

    This includes when the attacking team prevents or obstructs the formation of a defence line at a free hit awarded within 3.5 m of the goalkeeper’s area.

  7. When a field player kicks the ball twice, unless in between it has touched the player’s stick, another player or another player's equipment. (912) 

    This shall be considered an offence only if the player, in the referees’ opinion, both times kicks the ball intentionally.

  8. When a player receives a foot pass from a field player in the same team. (912)

    This shall be considered an offence only if the pass, in the referees’ opinion, is intentional. Receiving a foot pass from a player in the same team is allowed if an opponent omits to take the ball despite the possibility to do so. A foot pass to the goalkeeper is not considered a goal situation and can’t result in a penalty shot.

  9. When a field player is in the goalkeeper area. (914)

    A field player is allowed to pass through the goalkeeper area if, in the referees’ opinion, play is not affected and the goalkeeper’s actions are not hindered.
    If, when a free-hit for the opposing team is hit directly at the goal, a field player of the defending team is in the goalkeeper area, in the goal cage or, if the goal cage has been moved, in the area where the goal cage normally stands, a penalty shot shall always be awarded.
    A field player is considered to be in the goalkeeper area if any part of his body touches the floor inside the goalkeeper area. A field player with only his stick in the goalkeeper area is not considered to be in the goalkeeper area. The lines belong to the goalkeeper area.

  10. When a field player intentionally moves the opposing team’s goal cage. (914)
  11. When a field player passively obstructs the goalkeeper's throw-out. (915)

    This shall be considered an offence only if the field player is inside the goal crease or closer to the goalkeeper than 3 m, measured from where the goalkeeper gains control of the ball. Passively implies unintentionally or through omission to move.

  12. When a field player jumps up and stops the ball. (916)

    As jumping is considered to be when both feet entirely leave the floor. Running is not considered as jumping. A player is allowed to jump over the ball if he does not touch it.

  13. When a field player plays the ball from outside the rink. (no offence sign)

    Outside implies having one or both feet outside the rink. If a player plays the ball from outside the rink during substitution, this shall be considered too many players on the rink. If a player, not in the process of changing, plays the ball from the substitution zone, this shall be considered sabotage of play. It is allowed to run outside the rink, but the ball shall not be played from there.

  14. When a goalkeeper entirely leaves the goal crease during a throw-out. (917)

    In this case the goalkeeper is not considered a field player. The goalkeeper is considered to have entirely left the goal crease when no part of his body touches the floor in the goal crease. The throw- out is completed when the goalkeeper lets go of the ball, and if he leaves the goal crease after this, no action shall be taken. This rule shall also apply if the goalkeeper gathers the ball inside the goal crease and his entire body then slides outside the goal crease.
    The lines belong to the goal crease.

  15. When a goalkeeper throws or kicks the ball over the centre line. (917)

    This shall be considered an offence only if the ball does not touch the floor, the board, another player or another player’s equipment before it passes the centre line. The entire ball has to pass the centre line.

  16. When a face-off, hit-in or a free-hit is incorrectly performed or intentionally delayed. (918)

    This includes when the non-offending team takes the ball away when the play is interrupted, the ball is dragged, flicked, or lifted on the stick. If a hit-in or a free-hit is taken from the wrong place or when the ball is not entirely still, it may be taken again. If, in the referees’ opinion, play is not affected, the ball does not have to be entirely still or in exactly the right place.

  17. When a goalkeeper has the ball under control for more than 3 seconds. (924)

    If the goalkeeper puts the ball down and picks it up again this shall be considered controlling the ball all the time.

  18. When a goalkeeper receives a pass from a field player in the same team. (924)

    This shall be considered an offence only if the pass, in the referees’ opinion, is intentional. Receiving implies that the goalkeeper touches the ball with either his hands or arms, also even after the goalkeeper has possibly touched or stopped the ball with any other part of his body. A goalkeeper may receive a pass from a player in the same team if the goalkeeper is completely outside his goal crease when he receives the pass, and is thereby considered a field player. If the goalkeeper leaves his goal crease entirely, stops the ball, returns to his goal crease and picks the ball up this shall not be considered a pass to the goalkeeper.
    A pass to the goalkeeper is not considered a goal situation and can not result in a penalty shot.

  19. When a penalty is imposed for an offence committed in connection with play. (prescribed offence sign)
  20. When a player delays play. (924)
    This includes when a field player, in order to waste time, places himself against the rink or goal cage in such a manner that the opponent is unable to reach the ball in a correct way. The player should, if possible, be made aware of this before any actions are taken.

508 Penalty Shot

  1. When an offence leading to a penalty shot is committed, a penalty shot shall be awarded to the non-offending team.

    If a penalty shot is awarded during a delayed penalty or caused by an offence leading to a penalty, the rules concerning penalties in connection with a penalty shot shall also be applied.

  2. The penalty shot shall be taken from the centre spot.
  3. All players except the player taking the penalty shot and the defending goalkeeper shall be in their substitution zones during the entire penalty shot. The goalkeeper shall be on the goal line when the penalty shot starts.

    The goalkeeper must not be replaced by a field player. If the goalkeeper commits an offence during the penalty shot, a new penalty shot shall be awarded and any prescribed penalty carried out. If another player in the offending team commits an offence during the penalty shot, a new penalty shot shall be awarded and the offence considered sabotage of play.

  4. The player taking the penalty shot may play the ball an unlimited number of times, but the ball has to be in a forward movement during the entire penalty shot. As soon as the goalkeeper has touched the ball, the player taking the penalty shot must not touch the ball again during the penalty shot.

    Game time shall be stopped during the entire penalty shot. Forward movement implies away from the centre line. If the ball hits the front face of the goal then the goalkeeper, and passes the goal line from the front, the goal shall be allowed. If the ball at the very start of a penalty shot is drawn backwards the penalty shot shall be interrupted and started all over again.

  5. A 2 minute bench penalty imposed in connection with a penalty shot shall be noted in the match record only if the penalty shot does not result in a goal.

    The penalized player shall be on the penalty bench during the penalty shot.

509 Delayed Penalty Shot

  1. A delayed penalty shot shall be applied when the non-offending team still controls the ball after an offence leading to a penalty shot, and the goal situation is still in progress.

    If a delayed penalty shot is awarded during a delayed penalty or caused by an offence leading to a penalty, the rules concerning penalties in connection with a penalty shot shall also be applied. A delayed penalty shot may be caused by an offence leading to a penalty even if a delayed penalty is already in progress.

  2. A delayed penalty shot implies that the non-offending team is given the possibility to continue the attack until the immediate goal situation is over.

    A delayed penalty shot shall still be carried out after the end of a period or a match. If the non- offending team scores correctly during a delayed penalty shot, the goal shall be allowed and the penalty shot cancelled.

510 Offences Leading to a Penalty Shot

  1. When a goal situation is interrupted, or prevented from occurring, because the defending team has committed an offence leading to a free-hit or a penalty. (prescribed offence sign)

    The referees decide what shall be considered a goal situation. Offences in the goal crease shall not automatically lead to a penalty shot.
    A penalty shot shall always be awarded when the defending team, during a goal situation, intentionally moves the goal cage or intentionally plays with too many players on the rink.

    If, when a free-hit for the opposing team is hit directly at the goal, a field player of the defending team is in the goalkeeper area, in the goal cage or, if the goal cage has been moved, in the area where the goal cage normally stands, a penalty shot shall always be awarded.